New laws affecting Virginia drivers have come into effect

As personal injury attorneys with more than 600 years of combined experience, we know how important it is to be aware of the laws affecting you each and every day. As of July 2019, several new laws have come into effect that will impact Virginia drivers by increasing fines and penalties on some laws, while limiting restrictions on others.

As of July 2019, several new laws have come into effect that will affect Virginia drivers by increasing fines and penalties on some laws, while limiting restrictions on others.

Failure to move over one lane on highways with at least four lanes when approaching police, fire, EMS and similar vehicles stopped with flashing lights has grown from a class infraction to a class 1 misdemeanor, punishable by up to a year in jail or a fine of up to $2,500.

Increased Fines For Holding a Cell Phone in a Work Zone

  • Drivers are prohibited from holding a handheld personal communication device while driving through a highway work zone. The fine has increased to $250.

Increased Fines for Noncompliance Fees

  • People who pay the $500 Uninsured Motor Vehicle fee will have to pay more under another new law, while the eligibility for people to enter into payment plans to cover such noncompliance fees will also expanding.

Failure to Move Over for Emergency Vehicles Is Now Class 1 Misdemeanor

  • Another law increases the penalty for failing to move over one lane on highways with at least four lanes when approaching police, fire, EMS and similar vehicles stopped with flashing lights. The penalty has grown from a class infraction to a class 1 misdemeanor, punishable by up to a year in jail or a fine of up to $2,500.

Unpaid Court Fees and Suspended Licenses

  • Drivers who are unable to pay their court fees will no longer have their licenses suspended. Additionally, 627,000 Virginians will now have their licenses reinstated.

DMV to Designate Disabilities on ID Cards

  • The DMV will also be able to designate a person as blind or vision impaired on an identification card. Additionally, the DMV can designate on a driver’s license or ID card if a person has a traumatic brain injury if the applicant provides a signed statement from a licensed neurologist confirming their condition.

Parking in Striped Handicap Aisles

  • Finally, a new law prohibits parking any vehicle in the striped handicap accessible aisles next to parking spaces reserved for people with disabilities.

For more information about the law and how it impacts you, follow our blog at www.allenandallen.com/blog.